Who owns the most petrol stations in South Africa?

The data shows that Engen has the largest network in the country with just under a thousand stations across South Africa. It is followed by Caltex (683 stations) and Shell (637) stations.

Who owns Engen South Africa?

Do petrol stations make money in South Africa?

Although fuel sales still make up the majority of the profits at filling stations in South Africa (according to Absa, between 80% and 90% of profits), the additional income from forecourt businesses like convenience stores, coffee shops and restaurants, can be a nice supplement.

How many petrol stations are in South Africa?

Until recently, there were very few non-refining wholesalers supplying petrol and diesel in South Africa. Today, there are a number that are registered with the Department of Energy (DOE). There are approximately 4 600 service stations (forecourts – company owned and dealer owned) in South Africa.

How much is Engen worth?

Engen, which was founded in 1881 and now operates in seven African countries, has an asset value of more than R40 billion ($2.6 billion), according to the people. In its 2018 financial year, it posted revenue of 82.5 billion rand and net income of R1. 8 billion.

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How much is a petrol station franchise in South Africa?

A local petrol station business set up costs range in the region of R15 million and R100 million depending on the size and site. Further to this the operation payable to the oil company ranges between R2. 5 million and R15 million, depending on the cost to develop, projected volumes and profitability.

What is the cheapest franchise to start in South Africa?

8 South African franchises you can open for less than R1 million

  • Debonairs – from R900,500.
  • Wilcote – from R520,000.
  • 3@1 Business Centre – from R695,000 (ex VAT)
  • Zebro’s – from R949,000.
  • H20 International – from R325,000 (excluding VAT)
  • The Bed Shop – from R500,000.
  • Sorbet – from R1 million.

What is the most profitable business in South Africa?

Profitable Business Opportunities in South Africa

  • 1- Mobile Restaurant: …
  • 2- Budget Clothing Shop: …
  • 3- Business Setup Adviser: …
  • 4- Financial Adviser: …
  • 5- Niche Website/Information Portal: …
  • 6- Selling Online: …
  • 7- Foreign Cuisine Restaurant: …
  • 8- Web Design/Development:

Is Shell cheaper than BP?

Fundamentally, the answer is yes. Supermarket fuel usually comes from the same refineries as the big brands, and will have the same basic chemical makeup. … The likes of BP, Esso and Shell will usually add a wide range of special additives to their own fuels in order to improve efficiency and performance.

Which fuel lasts the longest?

Which fuels have the longest shelf life? Propane, alcohol, wood, and charcoal are examples of good emergency storage fuels that can be stored indefinitely and still remain viable.

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Is Shell fuel better?

Their fuel is portrayed to have a higher quality and be better for your car’s engine. Retailers like BP, Shell and Esso sometimes put additives into their fuel to help boost the fuel efficiency of your car. This means that fuel from supermarkets, without these additives, could be costing you more in the long run.

Who controls the petrol price in South Africa?

The petrol retail price is regulated by government, and changed every month on the first Wednesday of the month. The calculation of the new price is done by the Central Energy Fund (CEF) on behalf of the Department of Energy (DOE).

Do petrol stations make money?

Petrol stations don’t make much money

Retailers try to make about 4-5p per litre, but out of that they have to pay staff, business rates and corporation tax. Fuel stations often depend heavily on sales from the shop – a retailer can make more on selling a Costa coffee than on 40 litres of fuel. ‘

Will there be a fuel shortage in South Africa?

Refilwe Moloto asked Avhapfani Tshifularo (Executive Director of the South African Petroleum Industry Association) what is happening and how fuel prices could be affected. In a nutshell, Tshifularo assures the nation there will be no shortage of fuel, and increased imports won’t affect the price you pay at the pump.

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